Time limits

You may need to apply within a certain time for VCAT to be able to hear your case. Alternatively you may need to wait for time to pass before you can apply.

In some cases VCAT can extend time limits.

Check if time limits apply by choosing your type of case below.

Case types

Some details of the steps to follow during a VCAT case vary for different case types.
Choose a case type to see any case type specific variations.

Renting a Home

It is always best to start a claim as soon as possible while events are still fresh in the minds of the people involved.

A landlord should lodge an application to claim the bond within 10 business days of the date when the tenancy ended.

A landlord applying for a warrant of possession must do so 30 days after the termination date on the notice to vacate.

A tenant applying for non-urgent repairs must be made within 60 days after receiving the report from the Director of Consumer Affairs Victoria.

Check the Residential Tenancies Act 1997 for any other time limits.

If you apply outside of the time limit, you need to request a time extension as part of your application by quoting section 126 of the Victorian Civil and Administrative Act 1998. VCAT will not always grant your request for a time extension.

See how long your VCAT case may take to resolve.