Residential tenancy disputes – Join a VCAT case

If you want to get involved in a VCAT case about a rental agreement, find out what your options are and what you need to do.

Join a VCAT case

If you have not been named as a party in a VCAT application about a residential tenancy dispute but you have a direct interest in the dispute, you can ask us to add you to the case. We call this being ‘joined as an interested party’.

Who can join a case

We decide if you can be joined to the case as an interested party.

A VCAT member considers your reasons and decides if you can be joined before the hearing or at the hearing.

We join someone when we get information that shows us another person will be directly affected by the decision we make.

Who’s an interested party?

An interested party is someone who will be directly affected by a VCAT decision in a residential tenancy dispute. It is often someone who lives at a property but is not part of the rental agreement (for example a family member of a tenant).

As an interested party, you can participate in the hearing and have your views heard.

Get help and advice before you apply

These organisations may be able to help you.

Consumer Affairs Victoria (CAV)

Information and advice on renting and accommodation, estate agents, building, shopping and trading.

Tenants Victoria

Advice on renting and your rights. This service is available to tenants of all property types, including caravan parks.

Victoria Legal Aid

Free legal information and legal help for Victorians.

How much VCAT costs

There is no fee for you to join a case as an interested party, but there may be other costs you need to pay. For example, if you want to get an expert report prepared.

You pay your own personal costs such as travel, parking fees or time off work.

How to apply to join a case

If you want to apply to join a case as an interested party:

When you email us, it’s helpful to include a document that proves you have a direct interest in the case (for example, a bill or something else with your name and the property address on it). Explain why you want to be added as an interested party.

If there is no time to email us, you can come to the hearing and explain your reasons in person.

Ready to apply?

Ask to join a case as an interested party. Include the VCAT reference or case number in your application. 

What happens next

1 Ask to join the case as an interested party

Go to next step.

2 A VCAT member considers your request

If the member agrees, they make an order to join you as an interested party. If they want more information, you may have to attend a directions hearing where they decide.

3 Attend a directions hearing

If you need to attend to a directions hearing to decide on the application to join, we send you a notice. The notice explains what you need to do next.

The notice gives you the date, time and whether you need to attend by phone, video or in person.

At the hearing give us information about why you think you should be joined and we make a decision at this hearing. If you’re joined, the member makes an order to name you as an interested party.

4 We give you a notice of hearing

When you’re joined to the case, we give you a notice for the final hearing.

The notice gives you the date, time and whether you need to attend by phone, video or in person. The notice explains what you need to do next.

Check the time, date and location (if you are coming to VCAT in person). This is shown on the notice or order we gave you.

You can find out the time and room for your hearing at Upcoming hearings after 4.30pm on the day before your hearing.

5 On the day

If you are attending by phone or video

If you are attending by phone or video make sure you’re ready at the time we give you. It’s too late to ask to attend by phone on the day of the hearing.

Find out how to join the videoconference

If you are coming to VCAT in person

Arrive at least 30 minutes early to allow time to get through the security screening (similar to security at the airport) and find your hearing room. We schedule more than one case for the same time, so allow extra time for your hearing to finish. For example, if your hearing is scheduled for 2pm, it may not start until 3pm.

When you arrive:

  • Check your room at Upcoming hearings or tell a staff member at the counter that you’ve arrived for your hearing.
  • Go to the hearing room and be ready to present your case.
  • Speak to a staff member if you have arranged security, disability support, an interpreter, or technology for your hearing.

Bring any evidence you want to use to tell your side of the dispute.

Read more about what to expect at a hearing

6 Get an outcome

If you come to a hearing, the VCAT member makes a decision and gives an order.

An order tells parties how the case has been decided and any action that they must take.

All parties must follow VCAT’s decision. If you don’t understand the order, ask the member.

If you want the reasons for the decision in writing, ask the member at the hearing. The member may not agree to give you written reasons.

Help and support

  • You can bring someone with you to your hearing for support. This support person could be anyone you choose, including a friend or family member. They can’t usually speak on your behalf, but they can help explain what you need (for example, ask for a break). 

    You can’t bring someone to translate for you.

    If you need an interpreter you must ask us for a VCAT interpreter

    Support for people affected by family violence

    If you are a protected person or responding to a case and under a family violence intervention order, you can choose to bring a support person to VCAT. The support person can be anyone you choose, including a lawyer, social worker, family member or friend.

    Find out more about support for people affected by family violence at VCAT

    If you want someone to speak on your behalf, you must ask for it in writing.

    Template of written authority for someone to represent you

    Use this template to give someone authority to represent you. We call this person an ‘agent’.

    I, <NAME> (or Your Company Pty Ltd, if a company), a party in the VCAT case reference number xxxxx/20xx wish to be represented at VCAT.

    I give permission for <representative's name and occupation> (add 'employed by the company' if you're a company) to represent me.

    The agent has sufficient knowledge of the issues in dispute and has my permission to bind me to any settlement.

    Date xx/xx/xx

    Signed:______________ Name:______________ Position:______________

  • You can look at most VCAT files at our Melbourne office at 55 King Street, Melbourne if you arrange it with us. If you’re not part of the case then you pay a fee.

    In residential tenancy cases you can access documents for free if you’re:

    • a party in the case (applicant or respondent)
    • representing a party at the hearing – for example, you are the renter’s representative or the rental provider’s estate agent
    • advising or assisting a party who has given you permission to access documents on their behalf.

    Get a template to ask for access to documents
     

  • VCAT cannot give legal advice. If you do choose to get legal advice, you will need to pay any costs. 

    If you want to talk about what you should do, you can access free or low-cost legal advice or find a private lawyer.
      
    If you want a lawyer or other professional representative to speak on your behalf at VCAT, let the other party know in writing before the hearing and ask permission when the hearing starts. You will need to explain why. 

    For some case types you have an automatic right to representation.

    If the claim is for goods and services under $15,000, we generally don’t allow a lawyer or other professional representative to speak for you at VCAT. 

    If you do choose to get legal advice, you’ll need to pay any costs. 

    Read more about legal and professional representation
     

  • We offer a range of support services including interpreters, disability, security, family violence and Koori support. 

    Make sure you let us know what support you need to early as possible - when you apply to VCAT or get a notice from us.

    If you’ve been in touch with us about support before you come to VCAT, see our customer service staff at the counter or meet the support person at the location you’ve agreed on before the hearing.

    If you are coming to VCAT at King Street, Melbourne and you need support or information, you can visit the free services on Level 5 before the hearing:

    • Court Network volunteers offer free and independent support, information and referral services. They don’t give legal advice.
    • Victoria Legal Aid duty lawyers can help if you are unsure about your options or need advice about your claim.

    You can also contact us by phone, email, post or in person. Our staff can help answer questions about the VCAT process, but they can’t give you legal advice about your case or the outcome.

    Who you can bring to VCAT